• Plan An event with Stephanie Marston
 
Stephanie Marston is America’s Foremost Work-Life/Stress Expert Stephanie Marston
 

Parenting Quiz

How Are You Doin'g As a Parent?

  1. Your child says, "I hate my brother!" You respond:
    a."You can't mean you hate your brother. You really love him."
    b."It sounds like you're angry. I wonder what happened that's made you feel this way?"
    c."Seems like you're feeling frustrated. How can you let your brother know that you don't like it when he calls you names?"

  2. When your child leaves his toys all over the house or doesn't get her homework done, do you say:
    a.You're a slob.
    b.This place is a mess, please clean it up.
    c.What, are you stupid? You know your report is due tomorrow.
    d.I feel frustrated when you don't plan your time better. I'd like you to make your school work a priority.

  1. If your children are fighting over a toy, you:
    a.Let them know that if they don' t stop arguing, the toy is going to be yours for the day.
    b.Tell them that they can either share the toy or neither of them will be allowed to play with it.
    c.Praise your kids whenever they do share.

  2. How often do you discipline your kids?
    a.Rarely
    b.Whenever they misbehave
    c.Every day

  3. Your child has spilled his/her milk on the floor. You:
    a.Give him a sponge and ask him to clean it up.
    b.Yell at her and tell her she's careless.
    c.You encourage him to clean up the milk and praise him for his desire to become more independent.

  4. Your child says he can't find his backpack and it's almost time to leave for school. You:
    a.Frantically race around the house looking for his backpack.
    b.Remind him that it's his responsibility to keep track of his things and assure him that he can find it.
    c.Tell him that if he can't find his backpack, he'll have to go to school without it. Later you tell him that you know that from now on he'll put his backpack in a special place so that he can find it easily.

  5. When your children misbehave in a restaurant you:
    a.Threaten that you're never going to take them out to eat again.
    b.Let them know that either they settle down or you're all going to have to leave.
    c.You let your children know ahead of time how you expect them to behave and what the consequences will be if they don't cooperate.

  6. Your child comes home from school crying. You:
    a.Ask him what's wrong and when he says "Nothing," you respond, "You seem sad."
    b.Tell her, "There's nothing to cry about and to get over it."
    c.Ask her what's wrong and when she tells you "Nothing," you let her know that you're interested and will listen whenever she's ready to talk.

  7. One of your house rules is that your children can watch an hour of TV a day or play on the computer for an hour a day. When the hour is up you:
    a.Remind them that TV time is over. When they beg and scream, you stick to your guns.
    b.Remind them that it's time to turn off the TV. When they beg and scream, you give in and let them watch another show.
    c.Tell them that it's time to turn off the TV. When they protest, you let them know that they can either turn off the TV or lose their TV privileges for tomorrow.

  8. Your child wants to try out for the baseball team. This is the first time he's expressed an interest in anything athletic. After some practice time he feels discouraged. You say:
    a."You're doing just fine. It takes time to get the swing of things. Let's just keep practicing."
    b."You're right. You're not very athletic. Maybe you should stick with your art projects."
    c."Come on now. You're getting the hang of it. Be patient and you'll improve."
  9. One of your house rules is that your children can watch an hour of TV a day or play on the computer for an hour a day. When the hour is up you:
    a.Remind them that TV time is over. When they beg and scream, you stick to your guns.
    b.Remind them that it's time to turn off the TV. When they beg and scream, you give in and let them watch another show.
    c.Tell them that it's time to turn off the TV. When they protest, you let them know that they can either turn off the TV or lose their TV privileges for tomorrow.
  10. Your child wants to try out for the baseball team. This is the first time he's expressed an interest in anything athletic. After some practice time he feels discouraged. You say:
    a."You're doing just fine. It takes time to get the swing of things. Let's just keep practicing."
    b."You're right. You're not very athletic. Maybe you should stick with your art projects."
    c."Come on now. You're getting the hang of it. Be patient and you'll improve."


Congratulations! This quiz was designed to help you become more aware of how you respond to your children. Please don't use this information to make yourself wrong. Instead, use it to learn where you can strengthen your parenting skills. Trust me, we all have areas that can use some improvement.

Top of page

See how you did.

Here are the correct answers to the quiz.

  1. Your child says, "I hate my brother!" A better response is:
    b."It sounds like you're angry. I wonder what happened that's made you feel this way?"
    c."Seems like you're feeling frustrated. How can you let your brother know that you don't like it when he calls you names?"

    Both of these responses acknowledge your child's feelings.

  2. When your child leaves his toys all over the house or doesn't get her homework done the better responses are:
    b.This place is a mess, please clean it up.
    d.I feel frustrated when you don't plan your time better. I'd like you to make your school work a priority.

    Each of these responses focuses on the behavior you want changed rather than on criticizing the child.

  3. If your children are fighting over a toy you:
    a.Let them know that if they don' t stop arguing, the toy is going to be yours for the day.
    b.Tell them that they can either share the toy or neither of them will be allowed to play with it.
    c.Praise your kids whenever they do share.
    Any of these responses is effective.

  4. How often do you discipline your kids? "B" is the correct response.
    b.Whenever they misbehave

    We want the majority of the time we spend with our kids to be positive. On the other hand, we do need to correct our children's misbehavior; they actually want us to, although they'll never admit it!

  5. Your child has spilled his milk on the floor. The correct responses are:
    a.Give him a sponge and ask him to clean it up.
    c.You encourage him to clean up the milk and praise him for his desire to be more independent.

    We want to encourage independence in our children. And let them know that mistakes are a natural part of the learning process.

  6. Your child says he can't find his backpack and it's almost time to leave for school. The correct responses are:
    b.Remind him that it's his responsibility to keep track of his things and assure him that he can find it.
    c.Tell him that if he can't find his backpack, he'll have to go to school without it. Later you tell him that you know that from now on he'll put his backpack in a special place so that he can find it easily.

    Again, we want to foster a sense of personal responsibility. A rule of thumb is don't do for your kids what they can do for themselves.

  7. When your children misbehave in a restaurant you… The correct responses are?
    b.Let them know that either they settle down or you're all going to have to leave.
    c.You let your children know ahead of time how you expect them to behave and what the consequences will be if the don't cooperate.

    There is no point in making idle threats. The best strategy is to let your kids know ahead of time what you expect of them and then be willing to follow through with a consequence. When you want to change your children's behavior you have to make it a priority.

  8. Your child comes home from school crying. The most effective responses are:
    a.Ask him what's wrong and when he says "Nothing," you respond, "You seem sad."
    c.Ask her what's wrong and when she tells you "Nothing," you let her know that you're interested and will listen whenever she's ready to talk.

    "A" acknowledges your child's emotions and helps them to understand what they're feeling. "B" lets your child know that you're interested in what they're dealing with without pressuring them to talk.

  9. One of your house rules is that your children can watch an hour of TV a day or play on the computer for an hour a day. When the hour is up you… The most effective responses are:
    a.Remind them that TV time is over. When they beg and scream, you stick to your guns.
    b.Tell them that it's time to turn off the TV. When they protest, You let them know that they can either turn off the TV or lose their TV privileges for tomorrow.

    Being consistent is one of the most important strategies for effective discipline. Consistency means you are willing to back up your words with actions. You need to learn to talk less and act more.

  10. Your child wants to try out for the baseball team. This is the first time he's expressed an interest in anything athletic. After some practice time, he feels discouraged. You say…: The most supportive responses are:
    a."You're doing just fine. It takes time to get the swing of things. Let's just keep practicing."
    c."Come on now. You're getting the hang of it. Be patient and you'll improve."

    Sometimes we have to believe in our kids more than they believe in themselves. Your expectations and belief that your kids can do it is crucial in nurturing their growing sense of themselves and their talents.

This quiz will give you a sense of just some of what you'll learn in the online course Life Coaching for Parents: Six Weeks to Sanity.


During the next six weeks, you'll have an opportunity to refine your parenting skills through participating in this powerfully effective online course based on Stephanie Marston's groundbreaking book, The Magic of Encouragement: Nurturing Your Child's Self-Esteem. Each session is jam-packed with "kitchen-tested" tools and techniques for turning your family from what often feels like a battle ground into a peaceful, nurturing environment for your entire family.


back to top

 

Ask Stephanie Marston
Please contact Stephanie if your questions were not answered by this page.

Meeting Planners Information
Back to Meeting Planners Click Here

Testimonials of Stephanie Marston
Click here to read Testimonials

Meetings and Events for Stephanie Marston
Bring Stephanie Marston to your next meeting or event.
Click Here

 

Click here for information about my books and tapes.